Food

Brahmi: an ancient herb, a powerhouse of goodness

Chew a handful of brahmi leaves and you are sure to score better in Maths…” Well, this is an advice that was certainly not uncommon during up my growing up days.  Elders often recommended including Brahmi in your diet for it helped strengthening your memory and improved your concentration.

Brahmi herb
Brahmi herb

Also known as water hyssop and “ondelaga”, Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri) is a perennial herb commonly found in India and one that finds mention in ancient religious, social and medicinal texts as well as holy scriptures like the Vedas.  It has been a staunch favourite with Ayurvedic practitioners and a staple in their formulations given that it packs a world of goodness.

Brahmi leaves
Brahmi leaves

Treasure house of benefits

Brahmi has been used for a variety of reasons including alleviating stress, reducing anxiety, improving sleep patterns, boosting brain health and memory. It works wonders for the skin and hair too and hence commonly used in the treatment of hair loss and skin disorders like abscess, eczema and even psoriasis.  Brahmi oil is in fact very popular as it good for scalp health and regeneration of healthy hair.   It is rich in anti-oxidant properties and known to have anti cancer properties too.  It is anti-inflammatory and used commonly to cure cough, cold and conjestion.

A closer look at Brahmi leaves
A closer look at Brahmi leaves

Include Brahmi in your diet

Given that Brahmi has no overpowering taste or flavour of its own, it can be easily incorporated in your diet if you are a fan of healthy eating.  Brew a few leaves in water, add pepper and honey and savour as a tea.  You can also add small quantities of the herb to your soup, salads, chutney powder and even roti dough or dosa batter.

Brahmi chutney
Brahmi chutney

Further, add a couple of leaves to your normal coriander chutney and you have given it a super healthy twist!  Timare chutney and tambuli (which is a curd-based gravy) are popular dishes made exclusively from Brahmi leaves in the South. You can add it to your buttermilk and make your “neer mor” healthy! If you are in a mood to experiment, use it while making pesto which again is a great idea.

Read more about this super healthy herb in my article in The New Indian Express.

6 thoughts on “Brahmi: an ancient herb, a powerhouse of goodness

  1. Nice article….. even amrutha balli and doddapathre also very good for immunity….very easy to grow….. meny medicinal plant are their…. one must have it regularly for healthy lifestyle

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